Ariz. women more likely to be paid on par with men - Ahwatukee Foothills News: Money

default avatar
Welcome to the site! Login or Signup below.
Logout|My Dashboard

Ariz. women more likely to be paid on par with men

Font Size:
Default font size
Larger font size

Related Stories

Posted: Friday, January 25, 2013 5:49 pm

A new report from the federal government shows that women in Arizona are much more likely to be paid on par with men than in most other states.

New figures from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show that in 2011, the most recent data available, women in Arizona, on average, earned 88.5 percent as much as men. That is not only higher than the national figure of 82.2 percent but good enough to be the second highest ratio in the country, behind only California.

But a closer examination of the numbers shows that may not be an indication that Arizona employers are bigger boosters of eliminating the gender gap on wages. Instead it may simply be that men generally are paid less in Arizona than in other states.

The most recent figures bear that out.

In 2011, the average salary for women in Arizona was $694 a week. That is $10 higher than the national average and the 18th highest figure in the nation.

But Arizona men that year were earning just $784 a week, far below the national average of $832. That put men’s wages in Arizona just 36th of all the states.

BLS economist Todd Johnson said some of the reason Arizona’s gender gap on wages is not as large as other states is the mix of jobs here. He said Arizona does not have as many high-paying jobs — ones that have traditionally been occupied by men — as elsewhere.

By contrast, Arizona has a lot of office service jobs where women employees outnumber men by a margin of about three to one.

Johnson said that, ultimately, it comes down to simple math: As long as wages men are accepting in Arizona remains below the national average, then salaries for women, in comparison, will be relatively higher.

Dennis Hoffman, an economist at the W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University, expressed some skepticism about the Arizona numbers, given the size of the sample used by the BLS. But he said the trends going back over a decade do show that, as a whole, women in Arizona do better financially in comparison with men than on the national level.

Hoffman said, though, it’s not because employers here have any greater belief in wage equality. Instead, he said, it’s a function of the jobs available in the state.

“Arizona has not been able to attract significant numbers of high-margin businesses, business that look for highly talented men and women ... that can afford to pay highly competitive wages,’’ he said. Hoffman said while there are exceptions, citing companies like Intel and Raytheon, the state also attracts people willing to work for less because of the “sunshine factor’’ — and businesses looking for those employees locate here.

Marshall Vest of the Eller College of Management at the University of Arizona, said while the numbers are what they are, figuring out why is another story.

He pointed out that the report does not take into account a whole host of factors, ranging from the age of the workforce to the level of education.

All that, he said, “would make a nice study.’’ Vest said the real answer lies in collecting all that data for all the states to see the effects of each of those variables.

Vest also pointed out that California had the highest ratio of female-to-male salaries, with Arizona second and Nevada third. He said it isn’t clear what is going on in these three states that would make women’s salaries so much closer to those of men.

While the Arizona ratio for women is generally higher than the national average, Johnson noted there was one notable exception in 2009 when the situation was reversed.

One possibility, he said, is that the job losses at that time mainly affected men at the lower end of the pay scale. The result, Johnson said, was a higher average salary for the men left working.

Hoffman, however, questioned that conclusion, saying there’s no evidence that men at the bottom end of the pay scale were being rehired the following year. Instead, he said, it is more likely a statistical aberration.

More about

More about

More about

  • Discuss

We must protect the Grand Canyon before time runs out

In 1967, my father took me and eight of my brothers and sisters on a whitewater trip down the Colorado River through Grand Canyon National Par…

Published: October 27, 2016 - 9:49 am @…

Women Vital to NASA's Success: 'Hidden Figures' A Film AImed To Encourage Girls to take up STEM Careers

Volunteers play a vital part in various NASA explorations. The most recent involve the capturing of Martian South polar region images. Slabs o…

Published: October 27, 2016 - 9:50 am @…

Tucson man burning weeds with blow torch starts house fire

TUCSON (KGUN9-TV) - Authorities say a Tucson man using a blow torch to burn weeds started a fire that spread up a wall and into the attic of his home.

Published: October 27, 2016 - 9:40 am @…

How the Latino vote could affect the 2016 race

Record number of eligible Hispanic voters Campaigns targeting Latinos with canvassing and Spanish-language ads Las Vegas (CNN)Flor Cardona is …

Published: October 27, 2016 - 9:39 am @

11 Dog-Friendly Restaurants, Wine Bars, and Breweries in Metro Phoenix

Lauren Cusimano A A In 2011, dog-friendly patios got real in Maricopa County. A few rules apply, but there are establishments all over town th…

Published: October 27, 2016 - 9:28 am @…

Saturday: Howl-O-Ween party at Social Box in Chandler

Celebrate Halloween with your four-legged best friend when Social Box Neighborhood Eatery in Chandler hosts a Howl-O-Ween party Saturday.

Published: October 27, 2016 - 9:31 am @…

James Franco Directs Short Film ‘Do it Right’ Starring Gigi Hadid

James Franco is currently working on a few upcoming films that he will star in and direct, including “Zeroville,” based on Steve Erickson’s 20…

Published: October 27, 2016 - 9:20 am @…

Seattle Seahawks' Richard Sherman Dresses As Harry Potter

Richard Sherman may play for the Seattle Seahawks. But when it comes to magic, he’s Gryffindor all the way. The All-Pro cornerback showed his …

Published: October 27, 2016 - 9:19 am @…

Consumers Lose Coverage Options As Arizona Health Exchange Transitions

Published: Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 5:00amUpdated: Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 6:38am

Published: October 27, 2016 - 9:11 am @…

The Space Race of the past launched astronomy’s future in Tucson

By MIKAYLA MACE Arizona Sonora News On July 20, 1969, 600 million people watched Neil Armstrong set foot on the moon and say, “That’s one smal…

Published: October 27, 2016 - 8:59 am @…

Facebook on Facebook

Twitter on Twitter


Subscribe to via RSS

RSS Feeds


Most Popular

Online poll